Why is my Weed Drooping – And How Can I Stop it? [Solutions & Fixes]

Solutions and Fixes
MarijuanaBreak Staff MarijuanaBreak Staff / Updated on June 24, 2019

why is my weed drooping

Almost every grower has encountered, at some point or another, a situation where his/her plant starts to droop. Drooping weed isn’t hard to spot, and you definitely don’t need a Ph.D. to know that something is wrong. The main thing is not to panic!

Drooping weed is curable, but it’s essential to diagnose the problem before it reaches the point of no return. In this quick guide, we’ve gathered the main reasons why weed tends to droop and will also provide you with a few quick hacks to prevent it from happening in the future.

Why does Cannabis Droop?

Did you know that plants contain even more water than animals? Some of them contain anywhere from 90-95% water! As is the case with animals, water regulates a plant’s temperature and transports nutrients through it. Therefore, if there is a problem with your marijuana plant, the first thing to look at is how it has been watered.

When novice growers see that the leaves of their marijuana plants are drooping, they often assume it is a sign of an under-watered plant. A lack of water can certainly be an issue, and also has a variety of consequences, including:

  1. Reducing the rate of photosynthesis in the plant. This slows the rate of growth and development of the plant.
  2. Stagnation of nutrient delivery, causing nutritional deficiency.
  3. The plant is forced to breathe faster; causing the plant to invest precious energy in breathing, instead of growing.

cannabis leaves drooping

Lack of water might also cause your leaves to:

  • Droop
  • Become brighter
  • Shrivel suddenly
  • Begin to wither

While many new marijuana growers are overly enthusiastic and water their plants too often, others go in the opposite direction for fear of overwatering their crop! It is imperative that the roots of your plants have access to moisture 24/7 because they are continually losing water through their leaves in a process known as transpiration.

This process is how plants get water up from their roots. When your marijuana plants lose water from their leaves, they begin to pull water up from the ground. If they can’t get enough water from the roots, a variety of essential plant processes stop functioning. If you allow the roots to dry out, the plant’s dried shoots will die.

Underwatering is mainly an issue when plants are still seedlings. They are drooping, wilting, and clearly not growing correctly. You will also notice that the growing medium is not moist. Another symptom is when the seedling turns a dark green color and is stunted and twisted. Any new growth looks discolored.

What About Overwatering Cannabis Plants?

Now, if you are thinking; ‘Hmm…I need to water my plant’, then think again, as that is not necessarily the right solution.

Did you know that providing too much water to your plant can also cause your plant to die? Too much water prevents your plant from taking in oxygen. The roots themselves are negatively affected by the moisture. They soften over time and eventually die. Furthermore, your plant will lose its vitality and become vulnerable to pests.

Therefore, when you see your weed drooping, you may assume that it is in dire need of water. In fact, adding more could kill your plants! Aside from drooping leaves, other signs of an overwatered marijuana plant include:

  • Firm leaves which are curled down from the stem to the leaf.
  • Eventually, leaves begin to turn yellow.
  • Your plants begin to droop after being watered.

It is important to note that overwatering could mean giving too much water at once or watering your plants too often. You may also be using a growing medium that holds water without enough air, or else there isn’t adequate drainage.

Remember, marijuana plants get oxygen via their roots. The vital oxygen is dissolved in water, and there are pockets of air in a growing medium that provide a vital oxygen source. When you water your plants too frequently, the roots are stuck with stagnant water. At this stage, your marijuana is drooping because its roots are in dire need of oxygen.

Related Article: How to Grow Rainbow Colorful Weed

5 Solutions for Drooping Weed

1. Use a Growing Medium with Excellent Drainage

Choose your growing medium carefully. If water is unable to run to the bottom of the container, it stagnates by the roots which result in overwatered plants. We recommend avoiding clay-based soil because it holds far too much water. Invest in a premium-grade potting mix which includes perlite as this combination provides excellent drainage.

It is also best to begin proceedings with a smaller container to decrease the risk of overwatering your seedlings. Please ensure that there are ample drainage holes to allow water to reach the bottom of the container. If you find that water moves through the growing medium too slowly, add perlite to boost oxygen and speed up the drainage process.

Check the plant’s tray regularly and don’t allow it to sit in a dish that has collected runoff water. If you use soil with poor drainage, for example, it will resemble mud when watered too often.

2. The Finger/Knuckle Method

Learning how to water your cannabis plants properly is one of the greatest skills you can develop. If your plants are being overwatered, causing the leaves to droop, the best thing you can do is give them more time between waterings.

You can determine whether your plants need more water by placing two fingers (or knuckles) into the soil. Ideally, the top inch of the growing medium will be dry before you start watering again. If the soil is still moist at the top, wait until it dries before adding more water. If the soil is soggy, you have already overwatered your plants and must give them a few days to dry out.

When it is time to water your plants, continue adding water to the growing medium until you see approximately 20% extra runoff water drain out of the bottom of the container. If you find that the first inch stays wet for longer, it is a sign that you either need to give less water or else the drainage needs to be improved. Your goal should be to water your plants every 2 or 3 days.

3. Lift the Pot Method

Cannabis Career Grow Room

Another simple way to tell if a potted plant is thirsty is to pick it up. Marijuana plants tend to use all the water in their pots and, over time, become lighter. If you need something for comparison, you can get an extra pot and fill it with growing medium.

Now, you can use this new container to compare as it represents the ‘dry weight’ of your growing medium. If you pick up a potted plant and it only feels marginally heavier than your dry pot, then you know it’s time to get watering.

If the growing medium seems to remain wet for a long time (4+ days), you may need to improve the drainage. It can also become a problem if you put tiny plants in containers that are far too large.

4. Soil Sensor

Soil Sensor

This is another excellent way to measure the dryness of your soil. You can easily purchase a soil sensor online (Amazon), or in a gardening store. Soil sensors cost around $10-$20. They are pretty accurate, and you don’t have to rely on intuition. Simply prod the sensor into the soil to get a reading.

In case you were wondering, there are two primary soil sensor types used to measure moisture. Volumetric sensors measure the volume of water in the soil. Tensiometric sensors measure the potential soil moisture levels. A tensiometer is sensitive to the properties of soil and estimates how tightly a specific soil type retains water.

If you are an expert in horticulture and have money to spend, you could invest in Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR). It measures soil moisture quickly and accurately. However, it is costly and often needs recalibration. Also, you need a level of skill to interpret the data properly.

Overall, a basic soil sensor is your best bet. It is cheap, effective, and easy to use. More importantly, it could help you identify an issue with your soil before it becomes a real problem.

marijuana leaves drooping5. Choose a ‘Dry’ Strain

If all of the above doesn’t work and you’re still struggling, one of these strains could be the ultimate solution. This is also recommended for people that live in hot climates. There are specific strains from Colombia, Jamaica, Cambodia, and Mexico that grow very well in warm climates. These strains tend to thrive outside and are also perfect for those who cannot provide their plants with an adequate amount of water.

Alternatively, you can look closer to home for strains such as Green Crack and Blue Dream. Both are known for being relatively easy to grow. They don’t need as much water as other commercial strains, and can be left alone for more extended periods with less maintenance required.

How to Help a Drooping Plant?

Watering Your Marijuana Plant

The main thing to remember is that drooping (or wilting) leaves mean that your plant has a deficiency. Unfortunately, a deficiency can come from several areas. On the plus side, in the vast majority of cases, drooping leaves are a sign of a plant that has been overwatered or underwatered, or else it is a sign that your plant is either getting too many or not enough nutrients (and issues with watering are often linked with nutrient problems).

When you choose a growing medium with good drainage, you eliminate many potential crises from the get-go. You can check the moisture content of the growing medium by using your fingers or by checking the weight of the pot. A more accurate method is to invest a few bucks in a soil sensor which takes the guesswork out of things.

Watering your plants correctly to avoid drooping leaves begins by getting your timing right. It is best to water first thing in the morning. Saturate your growing medium until you see around 20% of the water dripping out of the bottom of the container. That is enough water for the day.

Don’t water the plant again until the first inch of the growing medium is dry. If your plants are drooping, let the medium dry out completely, and use a skewer to poke holes around the medium to aerate. Be careful not to damage the roots! Poke around the edges of the medium to about two inches down. You can create small holes by moving the stick in a circular motion.

Get another thin stick; this is your support. Place it close to the plant’s base and rest it, or else you can tie it to the plant’s main stem. Check to see that the branches and main stem of the plant are not weak and thin. If they are, it may be a sign that they are starting to stretch for light. In any case, place your plant directly beneath the light source, and ensure it gets at least 18 hours of light per day.

Drooping leaves in the early stages of the growth cycle will probably set you back a few weeks. Wait the extra time to begin flowering, and you can still benefit from a vigorous healthy plant that offers a significant yield.

Related Article: Growing 1 Marijuana Plant (Just For Fun!); Part I

14 comments
  1. Kmega
    Night time dropping leaves

    My plant looks great. But it drops only at night? By 4am or 5am its standing straight up. Any takes on this please??? No spider mites either or discoloration.

    1. Adam

      If they look great then what is the problem. Maybe they are drooping due to lack of proper lighting?

  2. Jessica Levy
    Upright and Healthy

    Weed can droop due to a number of reasons, and sometimes due to no apparent reason. I would recommend buying instead and saving a lot of money that you would spend on seeds and nutrition and which could then go waste. Why to get into these hassles? However, if you still want to grow, then give it the right temperature so that it remains upright and healthy.

    1. matthew barwell
      nah

      that’s preposterous, seeds cost $10 each and all the nutrients you need for a year of growing cost $50. a grower pays pennies per gram while a buyer pays about $10 per gram. Unless you’re both rich and lazy, you should definitely grow.

  3. Darin L Clements
    Meh.

    Doesn’t even cover half of what might be wrong.

  4. THC-Mike
    Not all leaves drooping

    Hi I transplanted two clones. One was solid and one had two large drooping leaves out of six on day two. I know they were watered recently. So the lights went out and in the am it looked better. Lights were 30” away and no hot spots .so I’m assuming it’s an over water condition due to roots not being established. I shaded plant and hoping it corrects it .

    1. Mike
      Some drooping leaves

      Might be getting too hot or light burn if it’s a powerful bulb especially if it Looks better overnight
      Check light height vs temp at canopy
      I had that issue and moved plant just outside footprint and slowly move back in
      Plant was lighting in color too
      Light said 30” I’m at 36” to 40” with a 630 watt cmh

  5. TMAC

    Have two plants in a grow tent. The lighting is fine, but one plant requires more water than the other because of two different strains. It took about a week to determine the correct amount.

  6. Lisa
    Droppy

    I transplanted my plant and watered it now it is dropped over

    1. Donna
      Rapidly droopy leaves

      Transplanted 6 days ago watered .leaves drooped on one drastically could lose it

  7. Frank DiPietra
    Droopy plants, help

    Just received some clones and they are drooping badly but they have enough water. This is an inside grow so it is a controlled environment. The only thing that I can think of is my 1000 watt bulb is too low of a canopy, your thoughts.

  8. Ernie McCracken

    That damn plant in the picture needs to be transplanted… look at the roots all over the edge of the potter.

  9. Leticia Beverly

    I have to agree with the Soil sensor method. I’ve tried this one and it was very reliable in checking the dryness of soil.

  10. Rebecca Slover

    Amazing and educational article. I will definitely try these. The soil sensor method seems creative. Thanks

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