Why is my Weed Drooping?

Solutions and Fixes
Nicole Richter / Updated on February 21, 2017

Almost every grower has encountered at some point or another, a situation where his/her plant starts to droop. Drooping weed isn’t hard to spot, and you definitely don’t need a Ph.D. to know that something is wrong. The main thing is not to panic!

Drooping weed is curable, but it’s important to diagnose the problem before it reaches a point of no return.

In this quick guide, we’ve gathered for you the main reasons why weed tends to droop and will also provide you with few quick hacks to prevent it from happening in the future.

Why does Cannabis Droop?

One of the most common reasons why weed begins to droop, if not the most popular is the lack of water. H2O is a critical element in growing a healthy plant. Did you know that all plants, including marijuana, consist of about 80% water?

Lack of water will have quite a few different consequences, including:

  1. Reduce the photosynthesis in the plant. This slows the rate of growth and development of the plant.
  2. Stagnation of the nutrient, causing nutritional deficiency.
  3. Breathe faster. Causing the plant to invest precious energy in breathing, instead of growing.

Lack of water might also cause:

  • Drooping leaves.
  • Leaves becoming brighter.
  • Leaves that shrivel suddenly.
  • Leaves that wither eventually.

Now, if you are thinking; ‘Hmm…I need to water my plant’, then think again, as that is not necessarily the right solution.

Did you know that providing too much water to your plant can also cause your plant to die? Too much water prevents your plant from taking in oxygen. The roots themselves are negatively affected by the moisture. They soften over time and eventually die. Furthermore, your plant will lose its vitality and become vulnerable to pests and unwanted insects.

Related Article: How to Grow Rainbow Colorful Weed

Drooping Solutions:

1) The Finger Method

 

This method takes a bit of practice but the best way is to learn how much water your plant needs. Each strain will act slightly different. The easiest way is to simply poke two fingers into the soil. If the soil is moist, you know you are good. Dry is bad, and if your fingers feel like they are entering a dirty bath, then you know you are over watering.

2) The Pickup Method

Cannabis Career Grow Room

Another simple way to tell if a potted plant is thirsty is to pick it up. Marijuana plants tend to use all the water in their pots and over time become lighter. If you need something for comparison, you can get an extra pot, fill it with growing medium. Now you can use this extra container to compare as it represents the ‘dry weight’ of your growing medium. If you pick up a potted plant and it feels slightly heavier than your dry pot, then you know it’s time to get watering.

3) Soil Sensor

Soil Sensor

This is another great way to measure the dryness of your soil. You can easily purchase one online (Amazon), or through any other store. Soil sensors cost around $10-$20. They are pretty accurate, and you don’t have to rely on intuition. Simply prod the sensor into the soil and presto, you’ll get a reading.

4) Choose a Dry Strain

If all of the above don’t work and you’ll still struggling, then this could be the ultimate solution. This is also recommended for people that live in very hot climates. There are specific strains from Colombia, Jamaica, Cambodia and Mexico that grow very well in hot climates. These strains tend to grow well outside and are also perfect for those who cannot provide their plants the adequate amount of water needed.

How to Help a Drooping Plant?

Watering Your Marijuana Plant

90% of the time, just adding water to your plant will do the trick. Add water to your plant until you see about 20% of that water drain out of the bottom of your plant. After a couple of days, you should start to see a healthy plant. (If water does not come out quickly or takes more than 5 days to dry out, you know you have a drainage problem)

Related Article: Growing 1 Marijuana Plant (Just For Fun!); Part I

Why is my Weed Drooping?
February 21, 2017
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2 comments
  1. Leticia Beverly

    I have to agree with the Soil sensor method. I’ve tried this one and it was very reliable in checking the dryness of soil.

  2. Rebecca Slover

    Amazing and educational article. I will definitely try these. The soil sensor method seems creative. Thanks

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