How to Get an MMJ Card in New Mexico [2020 Update]


Overview
Wondering how to get a medical marijuana card in New Mexico? Read on to find out! Our comprehensive guide details some program criteria and basic requirements.
State Program
Approved on
March 13, 2007
Online Application
Yes
MD Evaluation
Required
Yes
Card Validity
36Months
Patient Registry fee
$
Phone:
505-827-2530
Official Gov Site:
nmhealth.org

Several MMJ programs across the country are experiencing problems in terms of supply, licensing, and online registry platforms. However, medical marijuana in New Mexico is performing surprisingly in recent times.

Recent data found that medical marijuana sales increased by 17% in the first half of 2019, compared to 2018. Total revenue is around $10 million per month! Ultra Health, the #1 company in the state, earned over $9 million during the first six months of last year. As we reach 2020, there are an estimated 80,000 patients in the MMJ program in New Mexico.

Furthermore, up to 75% of residents are now in favor of full legalization. While it may happen in 2020, recreational cannabis remains illegal at the time of writing. Therefore, your only way to use the herb is by applying for the state’s MMJ program. Do you live in New Mexico and require a medical marijuana card? If so, this comprehensive guide on how to apply for the program is for you.

As a Resident of New Mexico, the Process Is as Follows

Step 1 – Contact a physician

The first step to getting a medical marijuana card in the state of New Mexico is to obtain your medical records. Next, get a signed physician’s statement from a doctor that is licensed to practice in the state. The appointment is usually a straightforward process. The doctor will ask you a few questions about your condition to see if medical marijuana is a viable option.

What if your physician does not approve of MMJ as a medicine? In that case, you can book an appointment at one of many clinics and doctor’s offices throughout the state. These facilities specialize in medical marijuana consultations.

Up until recently, only state residents could get a card. At that point, you had to provide proof of residency. For example, a New Mexico ID, passport, or another photo ID that declares residency (bank statement or utility bill).

However, in September 2019, New Mexico began to issue cards to non-residents. An Arizona resident named Duke Rodriguez became the first non-NM resident to receive a card in the state. Two petitioners from Texas also succeeded in their quest. All three were able to prove that they needed access to medical marijuana. A District Judge ruled in favor of the trio, although the state is planning an appeal.

Step 2 – Register online and submit your application

How to Get a MMJ Card

After the consultation, you will obtain an official document stating you are a valid patient.  (See below for the full list of qualifying conditions). Next, register online with the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH). Submit your application to receive your registry identification card.

In most instances, the doctor’s office that schedules your initial consultation will take care of the entire registration/application process. It usually happens on the same day as your visit. However, they charge a consultation fee. If your physician doesn’t sort it out, the onus is on you to do so.

*For further information on downloading the application packet, meeting with a physician, submitting the application, etc., feel free to contact the New Mexico Department of Health Medical Cannabis Program at:

Medical Cannabis Program

1190 Saint Francis Drive Suite S-3400

Santa Fe, NM 87505

Phone: 505-827-2321

Email: medical.cannabis@state.nm.us

Website: http://www.medical.cannabis@state.nm.us/

You should receive your MMJ card in the post within 7-10 business days.

What are the Costs Involved?

The New Mexico Patient Registry is one of the few in the country that is entirely free. You can access and complete the application by downloading the following form. A doctor’s appointment costs anywhere from $50 to $150.

Those who wish to cultivate medical marijuana must apply and submit a Medical Cannabis Personal Production Application. You also need a copy of your New Mexico driver’s license or state identification card. The license application fee is $30 unless your annual income is less than 200% of the federal poverty guidelines. In that case, it is free.

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What are the Qualifying Conditions Required to Receive a Medical Marijuana Card?

The New Mexico medical marijuana program officially passed on March 13, 2007. The House approved Senate Bill 523 – aka “The Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act” by a 36-31 margin. It quickly passed the Senate by 32 votes to 3. The law came into effect on July 1, 2007.

To qualify, a physician must diagnose a patient as having one of the following debilitating medical conditions:

  • Severe chronic pain
  • Painful peripheral neuropathy
  • Intractable nausea/vomiting
  • Severe anorexia/cachexia
  • Hepatitis C infection currently receiving antiviral treatment
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Cervical dystonia
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease)
  • Huntington’s disease
  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Epilepsy
  • Hospice patients

The above is not an exhaustive list. At the last count, New Mexico allowed for up to 29 qualifying conditions.

*For those applying for medical marijuana in New Mexico, please note that if applying due to:

  1. Chronic pain, the patient must have a second certification from a specialist.
  2. PTSD, the patient must have medical records showing a psychiatrist’s diagnosis.
  3. Glaucoma, the patient must have medical records showing an ophthalmologist’s diagnosis.
  4. Inflammatory autoimmune-mediated arthritis, the patient must have a certification from a rheumatologist.

Current New Mexico Marijuana Laws

The state recently decriminalized possession of small amounts of cannabis. If caught with less than half an ounce, the punishment is a $50 fine. Possession of between half and a full ounce is a misdemeanor. That said, you could end up in prison for 15 days.

Furthermore, those found with more than 8 ounces face a felony criminal charge, with a fine of $5,000 or more. More pertinently, a jail term of up to 18 months is possible.

As such, it is essential to apply for medical marijuana in New Mexico if you plan to purchase the herb. By enrolling and receiving approval by the state of New Mexico, you are permitted to:

  • Possess “an adequate supply” of marijuana. This is defined as a maximum quantity of no more than 230 units (approximately eight ounces) over three months. You can also possess up to eight ounces of concentrates across the same timeframe.
  • Purchase from a Licensed Non-Profit Producer (i.e., any one of the dozens of medical marijuana dispensaries in New Mexico)
  • Obtain a Personal Production License (PPL). It permits you to grow a total of 12 Cannabis sativa seedlings. You can also grow up to four mature marijuana plants. A licensed producer can grow up to 150 mature plants!

How to Renew Your Medical Marijuana Card in New Mexico?

How to Renew Your Medical Marijuana Card in New Mexico?

The process for renewing a medical marijuana card in New Mexico is similar to those applying for the first time. To restore your card, apply 60 days before the expiration of your old card. All cards are processed in the order they are received by the state.

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Can I use Medical Marijuana Anywhere?

New Mexico does not permit the public use of medical marijuana.

An enrollee’s participation in the medical cannabis program does not shield them from criminal prosecution for certain activities. These activities may include:

  • Using any form of cannabis on a school bus, school grounds, or property.
  • Marijuana use in the workplace.
  • Using cannabis at a public park, recreation center, youth center, or any other public place.
  • Transferring or distributing any form of cannabis product to anybody not authorized under New Mexico MMJ legislation.
  • Transporting any pot outside New Mexico or attempting to move a cannabis product outside state lines.
  • Possessing amounts of medical marijuana that exceed the allotted amount.

Can I Consume Cannabis in My Car?

No. Your car is a public place. As such, the use of marijuana in your vehicle is prohibited under 26-2B-5 (4).

Can I Take My Medical Marijuana to a Different State?

No. Medical marijuana patients may face federal and local charges of transporting pot if they cross state lines with the drug. This is true even if traveling in ‘legal’ states. If you need to leave New Mexico with your cannabis, contact the relevant Bureau of Health in the state(s) you are traveling in.

How Much Should I Consume?

We are not doctors or experts in medicine. Therefore, you should always consult with a medical professional before using marijuana.

If you have any other questions, feel free to contact us through our Facebook page.

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